If you're looking for a better egg white substitute, you're in luck.

You know that goopy bean juice that canned chickpeas are packed in? The stuff that you probably dump down the sink right after you open the can? That stuff is a major heavy hitter in the vegan world for its ability to replicate the creamy, foamy, shaken egg white goodness in cocktails and desserts.

No one is exactly sure why garbanzo juice, known as aquafaba, works as such a convincing substitute, but we do know that it contains around one percent protein, while egg whites have roughly 10 percent protein.

While it is unlikely that aquafaba contains more nutritional value than egg whites, there are a few perks, the most obvious being that if allergies, diet or personal taste prevent you from eating eggs, you can now enjoy some cool foods using the uncanny substitute. Using aquafaba also minimizes the already low 0.0113 percent risk of catching salmonella from raw pasteurized eggs. Some say egg whites smell like a wet dog; so if the funkiness puts you off, you might enjoy a subtler chickpea aroma. Of course, it’s also super sustainable and can be both cheaper and easier to use something you already have on hand rather than purchasing a carton of eggs or egg whites.

You can make whipped cream or meringue with sugar, vinegar and aquafaba. Bean juice doesn’t set as well as the original, but it gets pretty close.

Some companies make “Veganaise”-style mayo products out of the substance, while others use it in waffle and pancake recipes. Tons of vegan-friendly bars across the nation make stellar aquafaba cocktails.

The rule of thumb is that roughly one tablespoon of aquafaba equals one egg yolk and two tablespoons equal one egg white.

The coolest part? You can now make a ton of cool foamy egg white drinks like:

Pisco Sour

The video here shows exactly how to make a fabulous vegan pisco sour.

Boston Sour

Remember: Use two tablespoons of aquafaba and otherwise follow the recipe.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Substitute two tablespoons of aquafaba for the egg white. If you don’t do dairy, switch out the heavy cream for thick coconut cream. Really shake the heck out of it for a good minute or two — it’s a little more work than the recipe, but the frothiness will be totally worth it. Trust us.

Sources: Huffington Post, Breaking the Vicious Cycle / Photo credit: Luisfi/Wikimedia Commons, Dtarazona/Wikimedia Commons, Infrogmation/Wikimedia Commons